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Monday, December 26, 2011

0205: Remarks on the Principle of Non-Contradiction (II)



Entry 0205: Remarks on the Principle of Non-Contradiction (II)

Remarks by Richard I. Aaron:


“We use the principle of non-contradiction or consistency long before we become aware of it and of the important part it plays in our thinking.

“No one does try to think without using consistency or non-contradiction as his guide.

“It is our experience of the world that first disposes us to think in terms of non-contradiction and consistency.

“Our experience of the world affects our minds leaving permanent dispositions which explain our thinking.

“The principle of consistency is not alien to that [the real] world; on the contrary, it is something we have learnt from that world itself.

“Even when, in abstract thinking, we find ourselves most removed from experience, there is still a link with the empirical in so far as non-contradiction is our guide. For in so far as it [thinking] is guided by non-contradiction it is guided by a principle which in the last resort is empirically derived.

“We cannot conceive thinking without the principle; more we cannot conceive any item of experience falsifying it.

“This shows the measure to which our experience of the world has moulded our thought. It shows the strength of the dispositions which our experience of the world has engendered within us.” [1]

Note

[1] Richard I. Aaron, "The Rational and the Empirical," in Contemporary British Philosophy, Third Series, London: George Allen and Unwin Ltd., 1956, pp. 3-20.

Monday, December 19, 2011

0204: Remarks on the Principle of Non-Contradiction (I)



Entry 0204: Remarks on the Principle of Non-Contradiction (I)


Remarks on non-contradiction:

“A knower who violates the principle of non-contradiction cannot be said to know.” [1]

“The [principle] of non-contradiction is presupposed universally in any intelligible content of mind.” [2]

The principle of non-contradiction “is presupposed by every human being in every cognitive act.

“This principle is true of all possible facts, and its truth is presupposed by every cognitive act, from philosophy to science to balancing one’s check book.

“No matter what there is, it is what it is, and it cannot display contradictory characteristics at the same time and in the same respect.

“This applies to all past experience, all present experience, all future experience—and even to things we will never experience.

“If any truth has claim to both fundamentality and absoluteness, it is this.” [3]


Notes

[1] John R. Bowlin, Contingency and Fortune in Aquinas' Ethics, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), p. 99.

[2] Robert E. Gahringer, “The Foundation of Necessity in Practical Reason,” International Philosophical Quarterly, 1962, vol. 2, no. 1, pp 25-49.

[3] Tibor R. Machan, Objectivity: Recovering Determinate Reality in Philosophy, Science, and Everyday Life, (Burlington, Vermont: Ashgate Publishing Company, 2004), p. 33.

Monday, December 12, 2011

0203: Philosophy of Actus Essendi -- One Universally Valid Philosophy Recommended by Fides et Ratio (XI)





Entry 0203: The Philosophy of the Actus Essendi -- One Universally Valid Philosophy Recommended by Fides et Ratio (XI)



“Without declaring a preference for any school, the Encyclical [Fides et Ratio] recognizes philosophy as the best way to reach the intellectus fidei and to articulate a renewed dogmatic theology: an open and dynamic philosophy of being that is based on the act of being (actus essendi).

“Here it is suggested that one of the greatest limitations of modern enquiry is to have bracketed being, not to have succeeded in positing itself as a philosophy of being, thus encountering greater difficulties in finding the sapiential dimension proper to philosophical thought and in addressing the fragmentation of knowledge.” [1]



[1] Vittorio Possenti, “The Encyclical Letter Fides et Ratio in Relation to Modern and Contemporary Thought,” “Reflections on the Encyclical Fides et Ratio,” no. 17, in L'Osservatore Romano English Weekly Edition, 29 September 1999, p. 10.

Monday, December 5, 2011

0202: The Human Intellect’s Apprehension of the Actus Essendi




Entry 0202: The Human Intellect’s Apprehension of the Actus Essendi


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