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Monday, December 8, 2014

0383: The Self-Evident Connotation of the
Actus Essendi (XX)



Entry 0383: The Self-Evident Connotation of the
Actus Essendi
(XX)



In his Being and Some Twentieth-Century Thomists (New York: Fordham University Press, 2003), John F. X. Knasas makes a fine distinction—following Joseph Owens—regarding the difficulties that Gilson had with the conceptualization of esse in the sense of actus essendi

Thus Knasas writes: 

“Gilson insists that only judgment can attain esse. … Gilson is unopposed to a conceptualizing of existence. Once existence is grasped by judgment, the intellect does go on to conceptualize this object. This is the entire point to Gilson’s citing Aquinas’s habens esse understanding of esse. What Gilson opposes is conceptualization as the original grasp of esse. Judgment is the original intellectual grasp” (p. 227, n. 34).